Auditing Health and Safety Management Systems. 4th Edition - PDF Free Download (2023)

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1 Auditing Health and Safety Management Systems 4th Edition

2 SafetyMAP: AUDITING HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 4th Edition Published by the Victorian WorkCover Authority Victorian WorkCover Authority 2002 First Published 1994 (As A Guide to Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems ) Second Edition 1995 Reprinted 1997 Third Edition 1997 Fourth Edition 2002 ISBN This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be made to: WorkSafe Victoria P.O. Box 4306 Melbourne Vic 3001 Australia

3 CONTENTS Preface Acknowledgements Introducing SafetyMAP PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED The SafetyMAP approach The SafetyMAP process Starting out-conducting a self-assessment Continual improvement and self-audit Certification Documentation required Applying for a SafetyMAP certificate A guide to internal auditing SafetyMAP certification levels Definitions PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA Element 1 Health and safety policy Element 2 Planning Legal requirements and practical guidance Objectives and targets Health and safety management plans Element 3 Implementation Structure and responsibility Resources Structure and responsibility Responsibility and accountability Structure and responsibility Training and competency Consultation, communication and reporting Consultation Consultation, communication and reporting Communication Consultation, communication and reporting Reporting Documentation Document and data control Hazard identification, risk assessment and control of risks General Hazard identification, risk assessment and control of risks Specific Access control (Use of) Contractors Design Disposal of materials and substances Employee welfare Hazardous substances/dangerous goods.. 25 Permit to work Personal protective equipment Plant Purchasing goods Signage Storage and transport of materials Supervision Supply of goods and services Traceability Emergency preparedness and response.. 27 Element 4 Measurement and evaluation Monitoring and measurement General Monitoring and measurement Health surveillance Incident investigation and corrective action Records and records management Health and safety management system audit Element 5 Management review Comparison between SafetyMAP and AS/NZS 4801: Index TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

4 PREFACE Since its introduction in 1994 SafetyMAP has maintained its place at the leading edge of health and safety management systems auditing. In this 4th edition we have retained the original concepts and style of SafetyMAP, whilst aligning the audit criteria more closely to the format used in Australian Standards such as: AS/NZS 4801:2001, Occupational health and safety management systems Specification with guidance for use; AS/NZS 4360:1999, Risk management; AS/NZS ISO 9001:2000, Quality management systems Requirements; and AS/NZS ISO 14001:1996, Environmental management systems Specification with guidance for use. Past experience has shown us that the majority of interest is in the SafetyMAP Initial and Advanced Certification Levels. The Transition Level has therefore been removed from this 4th Edition to more closely reflect the preference of the majority of stakeholders. The inclusion of additional criteria at Initial Certification Level is consistent with the concept of continual improvement. A further change is to the arrangement of elements. The 4th Edition sets out criteria for auditing a health and safety management system under element headings equivalent to the major headings in clause 4 of AS/NZS 4801:2001. We believe that the changes will make SafetyMAP a better product and more compatible with Australian Standards. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This document was prepared by the Management Systems Branch of WorkSafe Victoria. Comment and review of the document was sought from a wide spectrum of organizations and individuals. This included employer and employee associations, individuals and organizations who have been successfully using SafetyMAP and health and safety regulatory bodies in Australia. The contributions made by those who reviewed the draft material and provided feedback were invaluable and are much appreciated. 2 PREFACE / ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

5 INTRODUCING SafetyMAP SafetyMAP (Safety Management Achievement Program) is an audit tool that provides the means to undertake an independent audit and review of an organization s health and safety management system. This helps to establish safer working environments that will protect people at work by eliminating, or better managing, health and safety hazards. This is consistent with the requirements of health and safety legislation. The audit criteria within SafetyMAP enable an organization to: measure the performance of its health and safety program; implement a cycle of continual improvement; compare its health and safety system to a recognized benchmark; and gain recognition for the standards achieved by its management of health and safety. The audit criteria describe features one might observe in a robust health and safety management system. However an organization may not require all of these features to have an effective health and safety management system. The system components should be based on organizational needs, circumstances and risk exposure, not an audit tool. The audit criteria are set out in Part 2 which also contains introductory and guidance information for each section. INTRODUCING SAFETYMAP 3

6 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED THE SafetyMAP APPROACH SafetyMAP provides a set of audit criteria, which can be used to measure current performance and identify those areas where an organization can improve, its health and safety management system. The audit process also helps to determine priorities and to allocate resources in the way that best suits the organization's needs. SafetyMAP is not intended to prescribe how to manage health and safety - it provides a systematic way of measuring how well health and safety is being managed. The design and flexibility of SafetyMAP enables it to be used to audit any health and safety management system. The use of SafetyMAP is voluntary, and organizations are encouraged to adapt it to their own environment. Integrating with other systems SafetyMAP is based on the belief that health and safety management should be included in the way every organization conducts its day to day activities. It is expected, although not mandatory, that the health and safety system is compatible, and preferably integrated, with other management functions such as quality and environmental management systems. Flexibility A basic consideration for any organization, large or small, should be the degree of risk associated with its operations. Where the risks to health and safety are greater, there is obviously a requirement for more elaborate and extensive procedures. Smaller organizations often operate under simpler structures, and generally do not need the same degree of complexity as larger organizations, however it is the risk factors that ultimately determine the system requirements. SafetyMAP was designed to be flexible in its application to organizations of differing sizes, management structures and business activities. SafetyMAP is intended to assist organizations to be more productive and is not intended to burden them with additional paperwork. The type of system, and the level of documentation required, is determined by the exposure of people to health and safety risks, not the size of the organization. Recognition, but not a legislative substitute The SafetyMAP audit criteria are not tied to any specific health and safety legislation or jurisdiction, and can therefore be used throughout Australia and New Zealand, as well as other countries. Various SafetyMAP criteria refer to the requirements of the relevant health and safety legislation, and conformance to these criteria would indicate that the organization has adopted the management practices needed to fulfil its legal responsibilities. However conformance to SafetyMAP criteria, whether recognised by formal certification or other means, does not assure compliance with statutory obligations nor does it preclude any action by a statutory body. THE SafetyMAP PROCESS Starting out - conducting a self-assessment Although all organizations will have introduced some level of health and safety management, it is likely that some matters are better handled than others. Before deciding what needs to change, it is necessary to assess the standard of the system currently in place. This is best achieved by undertaking a critical self-assessment. One method for conducting this self-assessment is to follow the SafetyMAP Initial Level User Guide. The User Guide provides an explanation of all Initial Level criteria and examples of the types of verification that may be appropriate to demonstrate conformance with those criteria. Organizations moving towards best practice should refer to the SafetyMAP Advanced Level User Guide. Self-assessment uses internal resources to investigate what procedures are in place, confirm whether they are functioning as planned, and identify areas for improvement. Alternatively, an external consultant could be engaged to provide an assessment of the health and safety management system and recommendations for improvement. 4 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED

7 Following the self-assessment, the organization will have a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of its health and safety management system and be better prepared for the next step. There are a range of resources available to assist those organizations starting out on the SafetyMAP journey. Publications and advice can be obtained from organizations listed on the back of this publication. Continual improvement and self-audit Once an organization s baseline health and safety performance has been determined using the SafetyMAP User Guide, the process for improvement can begin. The recommended improvement cycle is shown in Figure 1. The start of the process is the development of a health and safety policy which clearly sets out top management's commitment to health and safety. From this, a plan is developed to ensure that hazards arising from work activities are identified so that risks can be assessed and then controlled. Implementation of the plan is the next component of the process, followed by ways to measure and evaluate the risk controls to determine their effectiveness. Finally performance of the entire health and safety management system is monitored and reviewed to determine if it is achieving the desired results. However this is not the end of the process, because the policy, planning and implementation have to be reviewed and improved in light of the results from measurement, evaluation and reviews. This structured approach to the management of health and safety leads to a continual improvement cycle that ensures risks are fully assessed and controlled. SafetyMAP is based on this continual improvement cycle where an organization clearly sets out its overall health and safety policy, and a plan for improvement that includes realistic, achievable goals and timeframes. When it identifies a health and safety problem, it makes the necessary changes and then reviews progress. As new procedures are added, they are incorporated into the evaluation and review cycle. Organizations are able to move through this process at their own pace and there are no set timeframes. The self-audit process should focus on improvement. For those organizations that wish to introduce an internal audit process, some hints for effective internal auditing are included on page 8. To receive formal acknowledgment and recognition for its health and safety management system, an organization may choose to apply for SafetyMAP Certification. Fig 1. Typical health and safety management model Managment Review Measurement and Evaluation Health & Safety Policy Continual improvement Implementation Planning PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED 5

8 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED Certification To gain a SafetyMAP Certificate, organizations must be able to demonstrate to independent auditors that they have effective health and safety procedures that conform to the SafetyMAP audit criteria. Only organizations accredited by the Joint Accreditation System - Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ) may conduct SafetyMAP certification audits and award SafetyMAP Certificates. JAS-ANZ maintains a list of the accredited Certification Bodies and WorkSafe Victoria can also provide this information. Certification is available at either Initial Level or Advanced Level and it should be noted that the decision to apply for Certification is entirely voluntary. Initial Level Certification requires an organization to satisfy the requirements of 82 SafetyMAP audit criteria. These criteria have been selected as encompassing the building blocks for an effective, integrated health and safety management system that is also capable of meeting legislative requirements. Success at Initial Level is a significant milestone that should be seen as a foundation for further improvement. Advanced Level Certification requires all 125 applicable SafetyMAP audit criteria to be in place. Organizations operating at this level will possess the systems and processes to enable them to maintain their health and safety systems at best practice. They will be deriving maximum benefit from their health and safety management system and will have reached a level of excellence that others acknowledge and respect. SafetyMAP Certification provides the following benefits: (i) Cost efficiencies A health and safety management system that is functioning effectively will help to deliver longterm cost efficiencies through the prevention of work related injury and illness, better industrial relations and ideas for improved performance. (ii) Performance verification A SafetyMAP Certificate provides independent verification that the organization s health and safety management system is functioning as designed and is effective. (iii) Public relations As a public demonstration of health and safety commitment, organizations may advertise SafetyMAP Certification to customers, suppliers and members of the public by displaying the SafetyMAP logo. (iv) Due diligence A SafetyMAP Certificate demonstrates that the organization has the capacity to manage its health and safety responsibilities and is doing so effectively. (v) Competitive advantage A SafetyMAP Certificate is independent recognition of the attainment of health and safety standards often required as part of quality controlled tendering processes. The criteria used for auditing each Certification Level are listed on page PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED

9 Documentation required Complex documentation may not be required to demonstrate conformance to SafetyMAP audit criteria. However objective evidence is needed to verify the presence and effectiveness of procedures. In some circumstances, observation and discussion may provide a sufficient level of evidence. There is further information about objective evidence on page 9. Applying for a SafetyMAP certificate An organization should only apply for a SafetyMAP Certificate when it is confident that it can provide evidence that its health and safety management system conforms to the audit criteria prescribed for the particular level. The Certification process requires the organization to submit its health and safety management system to independent audit. The audit will determine whether the management system incorporates all aspects of health and safety covered by the SafetyMAP audit criteria and that health and safety is effectively managed within all areas of the organization covered by the audit. PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED 7

10 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED A GUIDE TO INTERNAL AUDITING A health and safety management system audit is a systematic examination to determine whether health and safety activities and related results comply with planned arrangements. It should evaluate whether these arrangements are implemented and will effectively achieve the organization s objectives. The audits should identify procedures that are not fully effective and provide information that will assist the organization to improve. The scope of the audit will vary according to the needs of the organization. Organizations may choose to focus their audits on critical areas, or they may do regular audits of the entire management system. Audits are not routine inspections An audit program should be seen as separate from a workplace inspection program. Inspections are conducted more regularly to detect hazards in the workplace and to check how well risk controls are working for particular activities, processes or areas. Audits look at the procedures that generate those outcomes, rather than the individual deficiencies and failures identified by inspections. Limitations Audits provide a snapshot of the health and safety management system under review. The effectiveness of audits is dependent on factors such as: audit process; cooperation and openness of the individuals being audited; competency of the auditors; and the audit standard. Audits must measure management commitment and support The success or failure of the health and safety management system hinges on the support given to the process by top management. Audits should look at how management commitment is being demonstrated. Audits are not designed to assess the performance of individuals Audits of management systems should be designed to assess the performance of the procedures in place, not of individuals working with those procedures. Auditors Auditors should meet the following criteria: they are not directly involved with the development or management of the area or systems under review; they have undergone relevant training in the conduct of audits; they are familiar with the processes under review (or have access to persons with this expertise) and are therefore capable of selecting appropriate subjects for analysis; they are capable of carrying out an objective review, and of reporting findings accurately and without fear of the consequences; they have written and verbal communication skills suitable for interacting with employees and management; and they have sufficient knowledge and training in health and safety management. Training in the techniques of auditing is clearly desirable. There are training courses available which are specifically designed for health and safety auditors. Audit Standard The audit standard is the document that describes the desired outcomes or criteria against which the organization will measure itself. The requirements of the criteria must be relevant and apply to the organization in order for them to be included in the audit. The organization may design its own audit standard or use a standard that is publicly available (such as SafetyMAP and AS/NZS 4801:2001). The advantages of using a public standard include the ability to benchmark health and safety management performance against other organizations and obtain certification. Ideally, the organization will design and use an internal 8 A GUIDE TO INTERNAL AUDITING

11 audit standard that suits their management system, operations and risk exposures, and check their progress at intervals by auditing against an accepted standard, whether or not they are seeking certification. SafetyMAP offers a staged audit approach. This means that organizations that are at an earlier stage of system development also have the opportunity for benchmarking and certification at the SafetyMAP Initial Level. Audits generate information for management action The ultimate purpose of audits is to provide management with fact-based information that can be used to review health and safety management system effectiveness and plan change to ensure continual system improvements. The information generated through an audit will provide evidence of conformance or nonconformance with audit criteria. It is not designed to provide detailed solutions to any identified problems. The audit report An audit report should contain information about the evidence that contributed to the auditor s judgement of conformance or nonconformance. The audit report should include opportunities for improvement where identified. It is a management responsibility to decide what changes are required as a result of an audit and to initiate actions to improve performance. The audit program It is important that the audit program positively contributes to continual system improvement. Audits need to be repeated at intervals which: will allow timely follow-up of areas where remedial action has been taken; and sufficiently cover critical areas. The health and safety planning process needs to consider the frequency of audits and which areas will receive the greatest attention. Objective evidence Like any investigation, an auditor needs to gather sufficient evidence to make decisions about the status of the health and safety management system. The gathering of evidence should include: an examination of any documents that describe the system or process; records that confirm that the system is followed as described in the written documents; interviews with personnel which explore whether activities match the documented requirements, and whether there are any opportunities for improvement; and actual observations of the workplace. In other words, an audit should go beyond the paper trail to establish the level of implementation within the workplace and whether the system contributes to improvement in health and safety performance. Evaluation of this evidence should enable the auditor(s) to determine whether there is conformance or nonconformance with the audit criteria. A GUIDE TO INTERNAL AUDITING 9

12 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED SafetyMAP CERTIFICATION LEVELS ELEMENT INITIAL LEVEL ADVANCED LEVEL (ADDITIONAL CRITERIA) 1. Health and safety policy , Planning 2.1 Legal requirements and practical guidance 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, Objectives and targets , Health and safety management plans 2.3.1, 2.3.2, Implementation 3.1 Structure and responsibility - Resources 3.1.1, 3.1.2, Structure and responsibility - Responsibility and accountability 3.2.1, 3.2.3, , Structure and responsibility , 3.3.3, 3.3.5, 3.3.1, 3.3.4, 3.3.7, Training and competency 3.3.6, 3.3.9, , , Consultation, communication and 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, reporting - Consultation 3.4.4, 3.4.5, Consultation, communication and 3.5.1, , reporting - Communication 3.6 Consultation, communication and 3.6.1, 3.6.2, , 3.6.5, 3.6.6, reporting - Reporting Documentation Document and data control 3.8.2, , 3.8.4, Hazard identification, risk assessment 3.9.1, 3.9.2, 3.9.3, 3.9.5, 3.9.6, and control of risks - General Hazard identification, risk assessment , , , , , , and control of risks - Specific , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Emergency preparedness and response , , , , , , Measurement and evaluation 4.1 Monitoring and measurement - General 4.1.1, 4.1.2, 4.1.3, 4.1.4, 4.1.5, Monitoring and measurement Health surveillance 4.3 Incident investigation and corrective action 4.3.1, 4.3.2, Records and records management Health and safety management system audit 4.5.1, 4.5.2, 4.5.3, 4.5.4, Management review 5.1.1, Total criteria in each certification level = SAFETYMAP CERTIFICATION LEVELS

13 DEFINITIONS Audit A systematic and independent examination against defined criteria to determine whether health and safety activities and related results comply with planned arrangements, whether these arrangements are implemented effectively and whether they are suitable to achieve the organization s policy and objectives. Audit report A written record of the audit, which accurately and concisely documents the objective evidence and clearly communicates the findings of the auditor(s) for each of the criteria included in the audit. Competent person A person who has acquired through training, qualifications or experience, or a combination of these, the knowledge and skills enabling that person to perform the task required. Conformance A judgment made by an auditor that the activities undertaken and the results achieved fulfil the specified requirements of the SafetyMAP audit criteria. While further improvements may still be possible, the minimum requirements are being met. Customer-supplied goods and services Customer-supplied goods and services are those which are supplied to the organization by a customer. The organization then performs work on that product or uses that service as part of another task. Dispute A dispute may arise in relation to: the identification of a workplace hazard; the assessment of the level of risk of a workplace hazard; control of a workplace hazard; statutory duty; or workplace changes. Employees The term employees covers all those who work for the organization, including casuals, part-time workers and long-term contractors. Facilities Facilities refer to washrooms, showers, lockers, dining areas, drinking water, etc. There may be specific legislative requirements and details in building regulations and codes. Hazard A source or a situation with a potential for harm in terms of injury or illness, damage to property, damage to the environment, or a combination of these. Hazard identification The process of recognizing that a hazard exists and defining its characteristics. Hazardous substance Substances that have the potential to harm human health. They may be solids, liquids or gases; they may be pure substances or mixtures. When used in the workplace, these substances often generate vapours, fumes, dusts and mists. Where there are legislative references to hazardous substances the definition may vary from the definition given here. Health and safety management system That part of the overall management system includes organizational structure, planning activities, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes, and resources for developing, implementing, achieving, reviewing and maintaining the health and safety policy, and so managing the health and safety risks associated with the business of the organization. Health and safety policy Statement by the organization of its intentions and principles in relation to its overall health and safety performance which provides a framework for action and for the setting of its health and safety objectives and targets. A dispute means a difference of opinion between two or more parties on a health and safety issue and which remains unresolved. DEFINITIONS 11

14 PART 1: SafetyMAP EXPLAINED DEFINITIONS Hierarchy of controls Hazard control or risk reduction whereby options are considered in the following order (from most to least preferred): 1. elimination; 2. substitution; 3. engineering controls; 4. administrative controls; and 5. personal protective equipment and clothing. Variations to this hierarchy to meet local legislative or other requirements are acceptable where the variations do not alter the intent of the hierarchy. Incident An unplanned event resulting in, or having the potential for injury, ill health, damage or other loss. Interested parties Interested parties, may, depending on circumstances, include health and safety representatives, health and safety committees, contractors, regulatory authorities, community groups, non-government organizations, special interest groups and others. Nonconformance A judgment made by an auditor that the activities undertaken and the results achieved do not fulfil the specified requirements of the SafetyMAP audit criterion. This may be caused by the absence or inadequate implementation of a system or part of a system, documented systems or procedures not being followed or a minor or isolated lapse in a system or procedure. Organization Company, corporation, firm, enterprise or institution, or other legal entity or part thereof, whether incorporated or not, public or private, that has its own function(s) and administration. Personnel A broad term that includes employees, contractors, and non-employees such as unpaid work-experience staff and visitors. Positive performance indicators Indicators, based on inputs into the health and safety management system, used to measure the performance of the system. These are called positive performance indicators as they relate to actions taken to prevent injury and illness. Examples of positive performance indicators are number of audits conducted, number of inspections conducted and percentage of job descriptions incorporating health and safety requirements. Procedure A document in text or graphic format that describes the reason, scope, steps to be followed and responsibilities for a component of the health and safety management system. It may also include definitions and references to other documents. Process A set of inter-related resources and activities that transform inputs into outputs. Record Document that furnishes objective evidence of activities performed or results achieved. Resources Resources include financial (e.g. money and time), physical (e.g. equipment, reference library) and human resources (e.g. health and safety coordinator, health and safety representative, health and safety consultant). Risk The combination of the frequency, or probability of occurrence, and consequence of a specified hazardous event. Risk assessment The overall process of estimating the magnitude of risk and deciding whether the risk is tolerable. SafetyMAP certificate A certificate issued by an accredited body which recognizes that an organization has fully satisfied the requirements of a SafetyMAP certification audit. Top management May consist of an individual, or a group of individuals, with executive responsibility for the organization. Verification Confirmation by examination and provision of objective evidence that the specified requirements of the SafetyMAP audit criterion has been met. 12 DEFINITIONS

15 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA The following section contains the SafetyMAP audit criteria and guidance material that will enable users to undertake an audit of a health and safety management system. The format of these pages is explained in the example below: Element 2: Planning < Element number and title 2.1 Legal requirements and practical guidance There are legal requirements which directly apply to certain activities, products or services of organizations. Sometimes additional practical guidance is made available in the form of codes of practice or published standards. In some cases, there are also industry agreements or exemptions which must be considered. It is vital that each organization knows which are applicable, and how their contents affects that organization. The legal requirements may relate to employees, contractors and suppliers... < Sub-element number and title < Guidance and explanation for elements or sub-element. Information in this area does not form part of the auditable criteria. > Criteria number Audit criteria numbered in Blue are Initial Level. Those numbered in Black are Advanced Level The organization identifies and monitors the content of all health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines relevant to its operation The organization s procedures, work instructions and work practices reflect the requirements of current health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines All personnel in the organization are advised of, and have ready access to, current health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines. EXAMPLE ONLY < Audit criteria Conformance with all applicable criteria is required to achieve either Initial or Advanced Level. PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA 13

16 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA Element 1: Health and safety policy The health and safety policy is an important part of the organization's health and safety management system. The policy is a general plan of intent and objectives deliberately chosen by top management which guides or influences future decisions. The policy is the basis upon which measurable health and safety objectives and targets and health and safety management system components are developed. The policy should be consistent with the nature and scale of workplace risks. The policy should be known by employees and interested parties. The policy should be periodically reviewed and revised to reflect changing conditions and information. Its scope should be clearly identifiable. The policy should be signed or endorsed by top management of the site as an indication of their commitment to health and safety. Top management may consist of an individual, or a group of individuals, with executive responsibility for the organization There is a documented health and safety policy, authorized by the organization s top management that: a) requires compliance with relevant health and safety legislation; b) is appropriate to the nature and scale of the organization s health and safety risks; c) states overall health and safety objectives; and d) demonstrates a commitment to the continued improvement of health and safety performance The health and safety policy is available to other parties, including regulatory authorities, suppliers, contractors, customers and those visiting the workplace The health and safety policy is maintained and reviewed periodically to ensure it remains relevant and appropriate to the organization s health and safety risks. 14 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA

17 Element 2: Planning 2.1 Legal requirements and practical guidance There are legal requirements which directly apply to certain activities, products or services of organizations. Sometimes additional practical guidance is made available in the form of codes of practice or published standards. In some cases, there are also industry agreements or exemptions which must be considered. It is vital that each organization knows which are applicable, and how their content affects that organization. The legal requirements may relate to employees, contractors and suppliers. There may be a need for the organization to obtain or organize individual licences, certificates of competency, registration or approvals. In some cases, the organization is also required to submit or notify particular information to public authorities. It is important also for the personnel in the organization to know and have access to the relevant information, and for it to be incorporated into the documents that describe how employees are to perform their work The organization identifies and monitors the content of all health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines relevant to its operation The organization s procedures, work instructions and work practices reflect the requirements of current health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines All personnel in the organization are advised of, and have ready access to, current health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidlines The organization and/or individual satisfies legal requirements to undertake specific activities, perform work or operate equipment including any: a) licence; b) certificate of competency; c) notification; d) registration; and/or e) approval Changes to health and safety legislation, standards, codes of practice, agreements and guidelines generate a review of existing procedures. As these requirements change, so the organization needs to keep abreast of the changes and make the necessary adjustments. [Note: Legal requirements may refer to actual legislation, and to certain agreements with authorities and interested parties. Practical guidance includes codes of practice, standards, guidelines and industry practices.] PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA 15

18 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA 2.2 Objectives and targets It is important to establish and document specific objectives that will enable the organization to realize the intentions of the health and safety policy. Measurable targets should be set for each objective. Once objectives and targets are set, measurable performance indicators consistent with the objectives and targets should be established and used. These indicators are useful for evaluating the performance of the health and safety management system Health and safety objectives and targets consistent with the organization s health and safety policy are documented, are appropriate to the organization s activities and consider: a) legal requirements; b) standards and codes; c) health and safety hazards and risks; d) available technology; e) agreements and guidelines; f) operational requirements; and g) the views of interested parties Specific health and safety objectives and measurable targets have been established for all relevant functions and levels within the organization The organization sets health and safety performance indicators that: a) are consistent with its objectives and targets; b) include actions taken to prevent injury and illness; and c) meet legislative obligations. 16 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA

19 2.3 Health and safety management plans Successful implementation and operation of a health and safety management system requires the establishment and use of a documented plan. The plan should be appropriate to the scale of the organization and take into account the organization s policies, objectives and targets, activities, processes, products and services. The plan should include details on how targets will be achieved, time-scales and who is responsible for actions within the plan. The plan should also be monitored and reviewed. In developing the plan consideration should be given to all current and proposed activities, processes, products and services of the organization. Consideration should also be given to normal and abnormal operations within the organization as well as potential emergency conditions. It is essential that the plan documents the methodology for reducing health and safety risks through hazard identification, risk assessment and development of risk control measures. The methodology should aim to accurately identify health and safety hazards and assess the risks, taking into account the nature of their current and proposed activities, processes, products and services. The methodology should be based on regulatory requirements or directives and take into account relevant codes of practice, standards and guidance documents. The methodology should identify persons responsible and accountable for hazard identification, risk assessment, development of risk control measures and review activities as well as the frequency of these activities. Organizations may also need to take into account the degree of practical control they have over the health and safety hazards or risks being considered There is a health and safety management plan that defines the means by which the organization will achieve its objectives and targets and meet its legal requirements. The plan: a) applies to all activities undertaken or proposed to be undertaken by the organization; b) is based on an analysis of information relevant to the nature of the organization s activities, processes, products or services; c) aims to eliminate or reduce workplace illness and injury; d) defines the organization s priorities; e) sets timeframes; f) allocates responsibility for achieving objectives and targets to relevant functional levels; and g) states how the plan will be monitored The organization documents its methodology to reduce health and safety risks through hazard identification, risk assessment and development of risk control measures in accordance with the hierarchy of controls and legal requirements The organization monitors its progress towards meeting the objectives and targets set in the health and safety plan and takes corrective actions to ensure progress is maintained Health and safety plans are reviewed on a regular basis, to ensure they are kept upto-date, and when there are changes to the organization s activities, processes, products or services. PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA 17

20 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA Element 3: Implementation 3.1 Structure and responsibility - Resources Provision of resources is a key component of a successful health and safety management system. Commitment from top management to provide sufficient resources to meet the health and safety policies and plans of the organization is essential. Resources include financial (e.g. money and time), physical (e.g. equipment, reference library) and human resources (e.g. health and safety co-ordinator, health and safety representative, health and safety consultant) Financial and physical resources have been identified and allocated to enable the effective implementation of the organization s health and safety plan(s) There are sufficient qualified and competent people to implement the organization s health and safety plan(s) Those who represent employees on health and safety matters are provided with time and resources to effectively undertake this role. 3.2 Structure and responsibility - Responsibility and accountability Top management are responsible for the standard of health and safety management in their organization, and for ensuring health and safety legal obligations are met. They should therefore have an understanding of the health and safety legal obligations applicable to their organization. Specific responsibilities for managing health and safety throughout the organization should be allocated (e.g. responsibilities for conducting risk assessments, undertaking incident investigations, etc.). This applies to all levels of the organization, including a top manager to implement and maintain the safety management system. There should be monitoring of the performance of personnel against their allocated health and safety responsibilities Top management can demonstrate an understanding of the organization s legal obligations for health and safety A member of the executive or board has been allocated overall responsibility for the health and safety management system and reports to that group on its performance The specific health and safety responsibilities [including legal obligations], authority to act and reporting relationships of all levels in the organization have been defined, documented and communicated Where contractors are utilized in the organization, the health and safety responsibilities and accountabilities of the organization and the contractor(s) have been clearly defined, allocated and communicated within the organization and to the contractor(s) and their employees Personnel are held accountable for health and safety performance in accordance with their defined responsibilities. 18 PART 2: AUDIT CRITERIA

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